About Bhutan

People And Society

The Three main ethnic groups, the “Sharchops”, “Ngalops” and the “Lhotsampas” (of Nepali origin) make up today’s Drukpa population. The earliest residents of Bhutan are the Sharchops whose origin can be traced to the tribes of northern Burma and northeast India. The Ngalops migrated from the plains of Tibet and brought Buddhism into the land. The other minority groups are the Bumthaps and the Khengpas of Central

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Culture And Tradition

Culture and religion Cradled in the folds of the Himalayas, Bhutan has relied on its geographic isolation to protect itself from outside cultural influences. A sparsely populated country bordered by India to the south, and China to the north, Bhutan has long maintained a policy of strict isolationism, both culturally and economically, with the goal of preserving its cultural heritage and independence.

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National Symbol

Everywhere in the country, you’ll find Bhutan’s mythology expressed in many different ways. Most striking is the name its inhabitants have for the kingdom, Druk Yul, literally meaning ‘land of the thunder dragon’ in Bhutanese mythology. You find the fierce white dragon in the national flag and weapon and during the Tsechus – Bhutan’s most important festivals – there are many expressions of and references to the dragon.

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Gross National Happiness

Gross National Happiness (Bhutan’s guiding philosophy) Bhutan has always valued the happiness and prosperity of its people since time immemorial. However, the concept of Gross National Happiness materialized only in the mid 1980’s. It was His Majesty the Fourth King who declared the importance of economic self-reliance and happiness and prosperity of the people. His subsequent pronouncement of GNH being more

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